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REVIEW ARTICLE
Tripuravaram VK Reddy, Sihivahanan Dhanasekaran

The Golden Proportion

[Year:2017] [Month:July-December] [Volumn:2 ] [Number:2] [Pages:49] [Pages No:79-83][No of Hits : 3643]


ABSTRACT

The Golden Proportion has been considered perfect, ideal, and desirable, and it has been used for many years by engineers and architects in studying beauty and in designing patterns and proportions. It has been proposed that the golden proportion is a useful tool for the evaluation of symmetry, dominance, and proportion in the diagnosis of tooth arrangement and in the application of esthetic dental treatment. The golden proportion is an element of design that a dental surgeon should be aware of. An understanding of this enigmatic proportion that has long stood for beauty may provide us with useful guidelines that can be combined with our existing knowledge and applied to our dental work for restoring dental esthetics with reasonable assurance of success.

Keywords: Divine proportion, Extreme mean ratio, Golden proportion, Phi.

How to cite this article: Reddy TVK, Dhanasekaran S. The Golden Proportion. J Oper Dent Endod 2017;2(2):79-83.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None


 
CASE REPORT
Selvanathan MJ Vinola, Saravanakarthikeyan Balasubramanian, Sekar Mahalaxmi

“ENDOCROWN”—An Effective Viable Esthetic Option for Expurgated Endodontically treated Teeth: Two Case Reports

[Year:2017] [Month:July-December] [Volumn:2 ] [Number:2] [Pages:49] [Pages No:97-102][No of Hits : 2534]


ABSTRACT

Endocrowns are a viable option for the restoration of extensively damaged endodontically treated posterior teeth. The main objective is to achieve a bonded biomimetic reconstruction, i.e., minimally invasive of root canals. The clinical procedure that involves the endocrown fabrication may be considered less complex, more practical, and easier to perform when compared with that of conventional crowns with post and core. This article highlights two different case reports of badly mutilated endodontically treated teeth, effectively managed by means of endocrown-type restorations fabricated with both metal-free and metal ceramicbased prostheses with a 6-month follow-up period.

Keywords: Badly mutilated teeth, Biomimetic reconstruction, Endocrown, Esthetics, Pulpless teeth.

How to cite this article: Vinola SMJ, Balasubramanian S, Mahalaxmi S. “ENDOCROWN”—An Effective Viable Esthetic Option for Expurgated Endodontically treated Teeth: Two Case Reports. J Oper Dent Endod 2017;2(2):97-102.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None


 
REVIEW ARTICLE
Angambakkam R PradeepKumar, Arunajatesan Subbiya

Cracks and Fractures in Teeth

[Year:2017] [Month:January-June] [Volumn:2 ] [Number:1] [Pages:53] [Pages No:25-30][No of Hits : 2003]


ABSTRACT

Cracks and fractures in teeth are difficult to diagnose and treat, especially in the initial stages. The etiology of cracks is still obscure. With an increase in both geriatric population and tooth retention, the incidence of cracked teeth can also increase. There are many types of cracks from simple craze lines to vertical root fracture. An astute clinician should make crack detection a part of diagnostic screening. Proper diagnosis and treatment of cracked teeth is not possible without knowledge of the types of cracks along with associated signs and symptoms. This review presents a brief introduction to the various types of cracks and will aid the clinician in crack identification and management.

Keywords: Cracked tooth, Fractured cusp, Vertical root fracture.

How to cite this article: PradeepKumar AR, Subbiya A. Cracks and Fractures in Teeth. J Oper Dent Endod 2017;2(1):25-30.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None


 
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Kavitha Mahendran, Sathish Sundar, Shobana Shekar, Baskaran Kumarasamy, Aruna Raj

Bluetooth for White Tooth

[Year:2017] [Month:July-December] [Volumn:2 ] [Number:2] [Pages:49] [Pages No:61-64][No of Hits : 1390]


ABSTRACT

Dental caries is caused by a complex interplay of factors, with pH of the saliva playing a crucial role in initiating the carious process in the presence of cariogenic bacteria. It is the second most common infection in the world next only to common cold. So its prevention becomes very important and we have to devise newer effective strategies for the same. This article enlightens a proof of concept and working model of an indigenously developed wireless pH monitoring device which will be converted into a miniaturized version in future.
The micro pH meter facilitates long-term tooth surface pH monitoring and providing real-time feedback to the patients and dental experts. The pH meter sends signals to an external monitoring equipment via Bluetooth facility and warns the subject about the pH status of his saliva. After the reception of the warning, the subjects should use routine brushing and flossing or use a medicated chewing gum or rinse with a mouthwash. Extrapolating to the clinical environment, this novel dental device can control a global disease called caries, which causes a lot of financial burden and time-consuming restorative dental treatment to patients worldwide.

Clinical significance: Real-time devices that monitor the pH changes in the oral environment and alert the patient prompting them to adopt preventive measures will help in executing oral care services on a day-to-day basis, thereby averting the need for comprehensive oral procedures.

Keywords: Bluetooth, Critical pH, Dental caries, Micro pH meter.

How to cite this article: Mahendran K, Sundar S, Shekar S, Kumarasamy B, Raj A. Bluetooth for White Tooth. J Oper Dent Endod 2017;2(2):61-64.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None


 
REVIEW ARTICLE
Priyanka H Sawant, Nilker Vimala, Leena Padhye

“Let’s go Green to get Our Globe Clean”: Green Dentistry

[Year:2017] [Month:January-June] [Volumn:2 ] [Number:1] [Pages:53] [Pages No:19-24][No of Hits : 1106]


ABSTRACT

Dentistry is an extremely important and foremost healing profession. In today’s world, with the increasing ecological disasters, it is highly obligatory to understand the paramount importance of being eco-friendly in every facet of our lives, including in dental practice, which has a huge impact on the environment. Eco-friendly dentistry is a term legally accepted by the Eco Dentistry Association, which is an emerging concept in dentistry. It is an approach to minimize the environmental hazards of dental practice and provide dental care in an environmentally friendly way. With the widespread introduction of beryllium into the dental industry, a large number of these workers are at risk for the development of chronic beryllium disease. Proper handling of biomedical and dental waste is indispensable for the dental profession. People have become much more cognizant of potentially harmful chemicals contained in plastic products, especially, bisphenol-A. This can be achieved by reducing waste and lowering pollution. Dental offices can use reusable towels, high-efficiency machines, and paperless records. A small change can make the overall impact of the dental office less damaging to the environment.
The purpose of this review is to discuss various ways that a dentist can choose to make the dental office “Green” and conserve precious resources with all the options available today. Eco-friendly dentistry is soon becoming the standard.

Keywords: Biomedical, Ecodentistry, Green.

How to cite this article: Sawant PH, Vimala N, Padhye L. “Let’s go Green to get Our Globe Clean”: Green Dentistry. J Oper Dent Endod 2017;2(1):19-24.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None


 
RESEARCH ARTICLE
Madhavi A Shetty, Vibha Hegde

Effects of Different Final Irrigating Solutions on Depth of Sealer Penetration into the Dentinal Tubules: An in vitro Confocal Laser Microscopic Study

[Year:2017] [Month:July-December] [Volumn:2 ] [Number:2] [Pages:49] [Pages No:69-73][No of Hits : 1044]


ABSTRACT

Aim: To evaluate the maximum depth of sealer penetration into dentinal tubules at the coronal, middle, and apical third of root canals, following the use of different final irrigation solutions.

Materials and methods: Eighty freshly extracted mandibular premolars were selected for the study. After decoronation, instrumentation of samples was done using Protaper universal rotary file system till F4. During shaping and cleaning of root canal, 5.25% concentration of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) was used for irrigation. The samples were then randomly divided into four groups (n = 20) depending on the final irrigating solution used. Group I: 17% aqueous ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (MA) (aq. EDTA); group II: 10% citric acid (CA); group III: 5% maleic acid; group IV: 5.25% conc. NaOCl. Passive ultrasonic irrigation (PUI) was used to activate each final irrigating solution. The samples were obturated using warm lateral condensation technique with guttapercha coated with AH plus sealer mixed with rhodamine B dye. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) examined the sealer penetration depth.

Results: The Kruskal-Wallis analysis results showed that there was a significant difference in the maximum depth of sealer penetration among all groups in all sections (p < 0.05). The coronal sections of the root canals in each group showed a significantly higher depth of sealer penetration than did the apical and middle sections (p < 0.05).

Conclusion: A combination of 17% aq. EDTA and PUI used for final irrigation proved to be more effective for sealer penetration into the dentinal tubules.

Clinical significance: Final irrigation protocol followed is of paramount importance in achieving complete disinfection within the root canal, and also the penetration of sealer serves as an indicator of the extent to which the smear layer was removed.

Keywords: Citric acid, Dentinal tubules, Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, Final irrigation, Sealer penetration.

How to cite this article: Shetty MA, Hegde V. Effects of Different Final Irrigating Solutions on Depth of Sealer Penetration into Dentinal Tubules: An in vitro Confocal Laser Microscopic Study. J Oper Dent Endod 2017;2(2):69-73.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None


 
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Jayaprakash Thumu, Anirudh Kadiyala, Indira Priyadarshini Bollu, Srinidhi Vishnu Ballullaya, Srihari Devalla

Effect of Staining Solutions on the Color Stability of Conventional and Bulk Fill Nanohybrid Resin Composites: A Spectrophotometric Analysis

[Year:2017] [Month:January-June] [Volumn:2 ] [Number:1] [Pages:53] [Pages No:1-5][No of Hits : 879]


ABSTRACT

Aim: This study is aimed to evaluate the effect of staining solutions on the color stability of bulk fill and conventional nanohybrid resin composites (RCs) when subjected to various immersion periods.

Materials and methods: A total of 120 cylindrical Teflon molds (4 × 4 mm) were obtained and divided into four groups of 30 each. Molds of groups I and II were filled with Tetric N Ceram Bulk Fill (Ivoclar Vivadent, Schaan, Liechtenstein) and Filtek Bulk Fill (3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA). Molds of groups III and IV were filled with Tetric N Ceram (Ivoclar Vivadent) and Filtek Z250 XTE (3M ESPE) incremental fill RC. Photo-activation was performed and specimens were incubated. Spectrophotometer analysis was done according to Commission Internationale d’Eclairage Lab color scale. After taking the baseline measurements, 10 samples from each group were immersed in distilled water (control, subgroup a), tea (subgroup b), and coffee (subgroup c) respectively, for 1, 7, and 30 days. The color values of each specimen were remeasured and color change value (E*ab) was calculated after 1, 7, and 30 days. Data were analyzed by Friedman’s test and Mann–Whitney U-test; p < 0.05 is considered to be statistically significant.

Results: Group III specimens showed perceptible color changes at 30-day immersion period in coffee and tea. In group I specimens, color changes were perceptible at 7- and 30-day immersion periods in coffee and only 30-day immersion period in tea. Groups II and IV specimens showed perceptible color changes after all immersion periods in coffee and after 30 days in tea.

Conclusion: It can be concluded that Tetric N Ceram has less color change than the other nanohybrid RCs investigated when immersed in coffee and tea after various immersion periods.

Keywords: Bulk fill composite, Coffee, Color stability, Incremental fill composite, Tea.

How to cite this article: Thumu J, Kadiyala A, Bollu IP, Ballullaya SV, Devalla S. Effect of Staining Solutions on the Color Stability of Conventional and Bulk Fill Nanohybrid Resin Composites: A Spectrophotometric Analysis. J Oper Dent Endod 2017;2(1):1-5.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None


 
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Saranya Dhanapal, Nivedhitha M Sureshbabu

Comparison of the Postoperative Sensitivity using Two Flowable Composites in Noncarious Cervical Lesions: A Randomized Blinded Clinical Trial

[Year:2017] [Month:July-December] [Volumn:2 ] [Number:2] [Pages:49] [Pages No:55-60][No of Hits : 819]


ABSTRACT

Aim: The aim of this study was to compare the postoperative sensitivity using two flowable composites in noncarious cervical lesions (NCCLs).

Materials and methods: A total of 136 teeth were randomly divided into two groups. In group I, 68 restorations were done using Filtek Z350 XT and in group II, 68 restorations were done using G-aenial GC Universal Flo. Sensitivity was evaluated using air blast, cold water, and cold ice stick. Visual analog scale (VAS) was used to record the sensitivity scores at baseline and at 2 days, 1 week, and 4 weeks after the treatment.

Results: When compared between Filtek and G-aenial groups in each test and at each time point, there was no significant difference in the reduction of postoperative sensitivity.

Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that there was no statistical difference in the reduction of postoperative sensitivity between group I (Filtek Z350XT) and group II (G-aenial universal flow) when used in NCCLs.

Clinical significance: There was no statistical difference in the reduction of postoperative sensitivity between two flowable composites when used in NCCLs.

Keywords: Flowable composites, Noncarious cervical lesions, Postoperative sensitivity, Randomized clinical trial, Self-etch.

How to cite this article: Dhanapal S, Sureshbabu NM. Comparison of the Postoperative Sensitivity using Two Flowable Composites in Noncarious Cervical Lesions: A Randomized Blinded Clinical Trial. J Oper Dent Endod 2017;2(2):55-60.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None


 
CASE REPORT
P Sindhu Padmanabha, Patrick T Arul, IB Geeta

Full Mouth Rehabilitation of Adult Rampant Caries with Pragmatic Approach

[Year:2017] [Month:July-December] [Volumn:2 ] [Number:2] [Pages:49] [Pages No:88-92][No of Hits : 804]


ABSTRACT

Aim: The aim of this article is full mouth rehabilitation of adult rampant caries with a pragmatic approach.

Background: Dentistry has evolved from treating pain and oral diseases to improving esthetics and the overall look and appeal of an individual. Rampant caries are the nightmares of every individual, which are even more grossly accentuated in adults when compared with children. It can lead to emotional imbalance and the near death of a person’s confidence. The prognosis of the treatment depends upon the age of the patient, extent of decay, cooperation of the patient, and the patient’s motivation toward dental treatment. Herein, the pragmatic approach comes into play, by focusing on what is still left in the patient’s arsenal. This simply means the esthetics of the patient’s dentition has been improved from the original appearance, but may not be perceived as “dental perfection,” which can be accomplished through adhesive restorations.

Case report: A 38-year-old female patient reported to the department with rapid widespread decay in her upper and lower teeth for 2 years, after her second pregnancy and was mainly concerned with esthetics in her anterior dentition. The treatment included extraction of hopeless teeth irt #16, 26, 46, 15, 22 and root canal treatment reinforced with fiber post #11, 12, 13, 14, 21, 23, 31, 32, 33, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46 followed by composite restorations to enhance the esthetics, and the missing teeth were replaced with removable partial dentures.

Conclusion: The esthetic result achieved may not conform to the highest dental perfection, but represents an effective way of protecting the teeth from further tooth structure loss, while effecting an improvement in patient-perceived esthetics. This is the concept of pragmatic esthetics.

Clinical significance: Composite resin restorations represent an effective way of enhancing the esthetics and conservation of the remaining sound tooth structure for rampant caries.

Keywords: Adult rampant caries, Case report, Composites, Full mouth rehabilitation, Pragmatic approach.

How to cite this article: Padmanabha PS, Arul PT, Geeta IB. Full Mouth Rehabilitation of Adult Rampant Caries with Pragmatic Approach. J Oper Dent Endod 2017;2(2):88-92.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None


 
CASE REPORT
Mridu Pant, Deepak Raisingani, Nidha Madan, Deeksha Khurana, Harshit Srivastava, Namita Somani

Veneer Crafting: The Smile Makeover

[Year:2017] [Month:January-June] [Volumn:2 ] [Number:1] [Pages:53] [Pages No:45-49][No of Hits : 727]


ABSTRACT

The appearance of dentition is of concern to a large number of people seeking dental treatment. The color of teeth is of particular cosmetic importance. There has been a recent increase in interest in the treatment of tooth staining and discoloration. Veneers are a conservative method for the treatment of esthetic and functional problems in the anterior region of the oral cavity. Since its introduction in 1938 by Charles Pincus, ceramic veneer restorations have proven to be durable and esthetic restorative procedures for treatment of teeth. Ceramic veneers are more conservative than crowns and maintain the biomechanics of an original tooth, with a success rate of approximately 93%. Due to that, the indications of this procedure expanded to a point where its use is now a common practice in dental clinics. This article highlights on veneer crafting and its approach toward smile makeover.

Keywords: Esthetics, Fluorosis, Veneers.

How to cite this article: Pant M, Raisingani D, Madan N, Khurana D, Srivastava H, Somani N. Veneer Crafting: The Smile Makeover. J Oper Dent Endod 2017;2(1):45-49.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None


 
CASE REPORT
Paromita Mazumdar

Conservative Management of Traumatic Tooth Fracture by Fracture Fragment Reattachment and Single Visit Nonsurgical Endodontic Treatment

[Year:2017] [Month:July-December] [Volumn:2 ] [Number:2] [Pages:49] [Pages No:93-96][No of Hits : 680]


ABSTRACT

Anterior crown fractures are common form of traumatic dental injuries that mainly affect the maxillary anterior teeth in children, teenagers as well as adult population. A trauma with accompanying fracture of anterior teeth is an agonizing experience for an individual requiring immediate attention, not only because of the physical disfigurement but also because of the psychological impact on the patient. Over time numerous techniques and materials have evolved for the restoration of the injured teeth, such as, resin composite with or without pin, orthodontic bands, resin crown, and ceramic crowns. Reattachment of fractured tooth fragments can provide good and long-lasting esthetics and function. Patient cooperation and understanding of the limitations of the treatment is important for good prognosis. This article reports management of complicated coronal tooth fracture treated by reattachment on tooth fragments on the palatal aspect and single visit nonsurgical endodontic treatment.

Keywords: Anterior crown fracture, Conservative treatment, Reattachment.

How to cite this article: Mazumdar P. Conservative Management of Traumatic Tooth Fracture by Fracture Fragment Reattachment and Single Visit Nonsurgical Endodontic Treatment. J Oper Dent Endod 2017;2(2):93-96.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None


 
CASE REPORT
Shirin Jha, Srirekha Aswathanarayana, Rupali Karale, Lekha Santhosh, Megha Kapadia

A Novel Approach for the Closure of Multiple Diastema: A Clinical Technique

[Year:2017] [Month:July-December] [Volumn:2 ] [Number:2] [Pages:49] [Pages No:84-87][No of Hits : 650]


ABSTRACT

Correction of multiple diastema without much preparation of the teeth is one of the challenges in clinical esthetic dentistry. Indirect restorative procedures render excellent esthetics; however, these are invasive procedures that lead to the removal of unnecessary tooth structure in order to achieve the desired result. Whenever possible, the most conservative approach is preferred over the invasive procedures. Many innovative techniques have been advocated, varying from restorative procedures, frenectomy, or orthodontic treatment for the closure of spaces in between the anterior teeth. When a relatively smaller diastema is present in between the teeth, extensive preparation of the tooth structure is not necessary and utilization of free hand bonding of composite resin may yield the desired result. So far, innumerable cases have been reported in the literature which has illustrated various techniques for closure of diastema. The following case report discusses a novel technique for closure of multiple diastema.

Keywords: Composite resin, Esthetics, Multiple diastema, Template.

How to cite this article: Jha S, Aswathanarayana S, Karale R, Santhosh L, Kapadia M. A Novel Approach for the Closure of Multiple Diastema: A Clinical Technique. J Oper Dent Endod 2017;2(2):84-87.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None


 
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
A Arvindkumar, Uma Maheswari, C Kingston, R Gnanaseelan, R Jonathan Emil Sam

Caries-preventive Efficacy of Resin Infiltrant, Casein Phosphopeptide-amorphous Calcium Phosphate, and Nanohydroxyapatite using Confocal Scanning Electron Microscope: An in vitro Study

[Year:2017] [Month:January-June] [Volumn:2 ] [Number:1] [Pages:53] [Pages No:6-10][No of Hits : 606]


ABSTRACT

Introduction: White spot lesion is the early sign of demineralization occurring under intact enamel which may lead to the development of caries.

Aim: The aim of this study is to compare and evaluate the cariespreventive efficacy of a resin infiltrant, casein phosphopeptideamorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP), and nanohydroxyapatite (nano-HA) on white spot enamel lesions.

Settings and designs: A total of 40 freshly extracted human maxillary incisors were used in this study. Enamel samples (2 mm thickness) were prepared and sample preparation windows were created (dimension of 5 × 5 mm) using adhesive tape, and the sample was made completely resistant to acid attack by coating nail varnish.

Materials and methods: The samples were divided into four groups, which are resin infiltrant, CPP-ACP, nano-HA, and control of 10 enamel samples in each group. The samples were evaluated using confocal laser scanning microscopy before and after the application of resin infiltrant and remineralizing agents.

Statistical analysis: Statistical analysis was done using analysis of variance and post hoc Bonferroni test was used for comparing intragroups and Tukey test for comparing intergroups.

Results: The mean value after demineralization is 245, 246, 250, and 247 μm for Groups I to IV. After remineralization, group I > group II > group III > group IV. After acid challenge for a period of 14 days, group I > group II > group III > group IV.

Conclusion: The resin infiltrant showed higher caries inhibition potential and superior acid resistance than CPP-ACP and nano-HA.

Clinical significance: The inhibition of caries progression by resin infiltration technique should be considered as an alternative approach to the more invasive therapies and warrants a place in the range of minimally invasive dentistry techniques.

Keywords: Casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate, Confocal laser scanning microscope, Nanohydroxyapatite, Resin infiltrant.

How to cite this article: Arvindkumar A, Maheswari U, Kingston C, Gnanaseelan R, Jonathan Emil Sam R. Caries-preventive Efficacy of Resin Infiltrant, Casein Phosphopeptide-amorphous Calcium Phosphate, and Nanohydroxyapatite using Confocal Scanning Electron Microscope: An in vitro Study. J Oper Dent Endod 2017;2(1):6-10.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None


 
RESEARCH ARTICLE
Burak Gümüştaş, Özge Gürbüz, Begüm G Efes

Effects of Bleaching Agents, Neutral Fluoride Gels, and Surface Sealants on Enamel Surface Roughness.

[Year:2017] [Month:July-December] [Volumn:2 ] [Number:2] [Pages:49] [Pages No:74-78][No of Hits : 584]


ABSTRACT

Aim: The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the surface roughness of enamel after the application of different bleaching agents and to determine the effect of fluoride and bonding agent application on the roughness of bleached enamel.

Materials and methods: Forty-two dental slice polished enamel surfaces were randomly assigned to six groups. The surfaces of the slices were treated with 30% carbamide peroxide (CP) (groups I to III), or 38% hydrogen peroxide (HP) (groups IV to VI). Groups I and IV were only bleached. Topical fluoride was applied to the bleached surface of groups II and V. Groups III and VI were covered with a bonding agent. The surface roughness was analyzed with a profilometer. Data were subjected to analysis of one-way analysis of variance, Kruskal-Wallis, and Mann-Whitney U tests (p > 0.05).

Results: There were no statistically significant differences between the surface roughness of the untreated control specimens and the specimens treated with the bleaching materials, fluoride gel, and dental bonding agent (p > 0.05).

Conclusion: Bleaching treatment with 38% HP and 30% CP does not alter enamel surface roughness.

Clinical significance: The application of topical neutral sodium fluoride agents and dental bonding agents does not have any influence on enamel surface roughness.

Keywords: Enamel, Hydrogen peroxide, Surface properties, Tooth bleaching.

How to cite this article: Gümüştaş B, Gürbüz Ö, Efes BG. Effects of Bleaching Agents, Neutral Fluoride Gels, and Surface Sealants on Enamel Surface Roughness. J Oper Dent Endod 2017;2(2):74-78.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None


 
RESEARCH ARTICLE
Santosh Kumar P, Vidhya S, Mahalaxmi S

Antimicrobial Efficacy of Various Concentrations of Bamboo Salt against Enterococcus faecalis and Candida albicans: An in vitro Study

[Year:2017] [Month:July-December] [Volumn:2 ] [Number:2] [Pages:49] [Pages No:65-68][No of Hits : 578]


ABSTRACT

Sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) remains the gold standard against which any new endodontic irrigant is compared. But, its inadvertent extrusion beyond the confines of the root canal can be caustic to vital periapical or periodontal tissues. There has been an increase in the use of herbal medicines as irrigants over the last two decades. Bamboo salt is a Korean folk medicine, which shows promising antimicrobial, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory properties. The aim of this in vitro study was to comparatively evaluate the effectiveness of 1, 3, and 5% bamboo salt against Enterococcus faecalis and Candida albicans using agar diffusion test; 4% NaOCl was used as control. The experiment was performed in triplicate and the zone of inhibition (ZOI) was measured. The results of the present study showed that 4% NaOCl and 5% bamboo salt showed significantly higher mean ZOI than the other groups against E. faecalis; 4% NaOCl showed significantly higher mean ZOI than the other groups against C. albicans, followed by 5 and 3% bamboo salt. Hence, it can be concluded that 4% NaOCl proved to be the most effective antimicrobial against both the species; 5% bamboo salt was as effective as 4% NaOCl against E. faecalis, but significantly less effective against C. albicans.

Keywords: Antimicrobial, Bamboo salt, Candida albicans, Endodontic irrigants, Enterococcus faecalis, Sodium hypochlorite.

How to cite this article: Santosh Kumar P, Vidhya S, Mahalaxmi S. Antimicrobial Efficacy of Various Concentrations of Bamboo Salt against Enterococcus faecalis and Candida albicans: An in vitro Study. J Oper Dent Endod 2017;2(2):65-68.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None


 
CASE REPORT
Manali R Srinivasan, Cruz Nishanthine

Endodontic Surgery: Is it an Obsolete Clinical Procedure?

[Year:2017] [Month:January-June] [Volumn:2 ] [Number:1] [Pages:53] [Pages No:40-44][No of Hits : 577]


ABSTRACT

Endodontic surgery has developed the perception as an unnecessary procedure, with the emergence of implants. This opinion has been based on endodontic surgery being performed using obsolete concepts and techniques that compromised the potential for clinical success, frequently resulting in the persistence of patient symptoms, periapical pathology, and, ultimately, extraction of the treated tooth. With the emerging concepts of magnification, advanced principles of soft and hard tissue management, use of tissue regenerative root-end filling materials, and enhanced principles of wound closure, surgical endodontics has emerged as a highly predictable and comparatively painless procedure. Periapical surgery should be regarded as the method of choice when orthograde endodontic therapy cannot be performed. The present study describes indications of endodontic surgery and a few cases successfully managed using endodontic surgery.

Keywords: Endodontic surgery, Periapical surgery, Periradicular surgery, Persistent periapical infection.

How to cite this article: Srinivasan MR, Nishanthine C. Endodontic Surgery: Is it an Obsolete Clinical Procedure? J Oper Dent Endod 2017;2(1):40-44.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None


 
CASE REPORT
Nidha Madan, Harshita Gwalani, Deepak Raisingani, Ashwini Prasad, Harshit Srivastava

Management of Maxillary First Molar with Six Canals using Cone Beam Computed Tomography

[Year:2017] [Month:January-June] [Volumn:2 ] [Number:1] [Pages:53] [Pages No:36-39][No of Hits : 564]


ABSTRACT

The probability of morphologic variations in a tooth should never be misconstrued and the cognition of these variations is the cue to successful endodontic treatment. The form, configuration, and number of root canals in maxillary first molar have been studied for more than half a century. An anatomic variation like three canals in the distal root of maxillary first molar is not frequently reported. Apart from a properly designed access cavity, well-angulated radiographs, and routine use of loupes, the practitioner should consider using cone beam computed tomography as an auxiliary method for detecting complex root canal anatomy. This clinical case report presents the successful management of maxillary first molar with six root canals with the use of computed tomography scans as a diagnostic aid.

Key Messages: The incidence of second distobuccal canal ranges from 1.64 to 9.5%. However, the incidence of third distal canal (distopalatal) is rare (<1%). This report highlights the importance of computed tomography in the successful diagnosis and management of maxillary first molar.

Keywords: Cone beam computed tomography, Maxillary first molar, Six canals.

How to cite this article: Madan N, Gwalani H, Raisingani D, Prasad A, Srivastava H. Management of Maxillary First Molar with Six Canals using Cone Beam Computed Tomography. J Oper Dent Endod 2017;2(1):36-39.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None


 
CASE REPORT
Sahle AK Karanath, IB Geeta, Jayson M James

Management of Internal Resorption: A Catch-22 Situation

[Year:2017] [Month:January-June] [Volumn:2 ] [Number:1] [Pages:53] [Pages No:31-35][No of Hits : 526]


ABSTRACT

Internal resorption (IR), a rare phenomenon, is considered to be a catch-22 situation from the standpoints of both its diagnosis and treatment. It begins initially in the pulpal space and extends into the surrounding dentin. Its diagnosis and management have been a challenge to dental practitioners. Due to its insidious pathology, IR can progress to a great extent before its detection. It is usually asymptomatic and discovered by chance on routine radiographic examinations or by a classic clinical sign, “pink spot” in the crown. The treatment of this condition should be initiated as soon as possible to prevent further loss of hard tissue or an eventual root perforation. The resorption, if progressed to involve an external communication, has poor prognosis, and the tooth cannot be retained in most cases, and hence, extraction of the tooth is indicated. In modern dentistry, patients demand more than restoration of function; they are particular about the esthetics as well, especially in the anterior region. Once the proper diagnosis is made, the treatment modality should include steps taken to conserve the tooth structure as much as possible to restore tooth form, function, and esthetics. This case report describes the management of an IR of a maxillary central incisor that was treated nonsurgically with conventional root canal treatment followed by reinforcing the tooth with esthetic fiber post and conserving the natural tooth as such. A 9-month follow-up demonstrated clinically asymptomatic and adequately functional tooth, with radiographic signs of healing. In this case report, care was taken to conserve the tooth structure and avoid further weakening of the already compromised tooth. A tooth deemed having questionable prognosis was preserved intact and showed satisfactory healing with no progression of the resorptive defect.

Keywords: Case report, Fiber post, Internal resorption, Pink tooth of mummery.

How to cite this article: Karanath SAK, Geeta IB, James JM. Management of Internal Resorption: A Catch-22 Situation. J Oper Dent Endod 2017;2(1):31-35.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None


 
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Baskaran Veni Ashok, Gopal Shankarnarayan, Meenakshisundaram Rajasekaran, Rashmi, Saravanan Poorni, Manali R Srinivasan

Influence of Socioeconomic Status on Caries Prevalence in Chennai Population: A Cross-sectional Study

[Year:2017] [Month:January-June] [Volumn:2 ] [Number:1] [Pages:53] [Pages No:15-18][No of Hits : 504]


ABSTRACT

Aim: The aim of the present study is to evaluate the influence of socioeconomic status and social habits on the prevalence of dental caries in Chennai population. Cross sectional study was conducted in 500 patients by survey method using a questionnaire. Data was collected based on demographic details, information on the income, educational qualification, occupation, social habits (tobacco and alcohol consumption) and the caries exposure in terms of presence or absence of dental caries or a restoration. The data was tabulated using Microsoft Excel and statistically analysed using SPSS version 22. 91.8% of subjects in the lower socio economic status have a caries exposure while only 82% and 73.4% of the medium and higher economic status had caries. Within the limitations of the present study it can be concluded that there exists a connection between the individuals’ socio economic condition and the oral health status that calls for implementation of oral health programs.

Keywords: Caries prevalence, Socioeconomic status, Tobacco users and dental caries.

How to cite this article: Ashok BV, Shankarnarayan G,Rajasekaran M, Rashmi, Poorni S, Srinivasan MR. Influence of Socioeconomic Status on Caries Prevalence in Chennai Population: A Crosssectional Study. J Oper Dent Endod 2017;2(1):15-18.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None


 
Invited Review
N Velmurugan

Revascularization of Necrotic Immature Permanent Teeth: An Update

[Year:2016] [Month:January-June] [Volumn:1 ] [Number:1] [Pages:45] [Pages No:18-24][No of Hits : 2549]


ABSTRACT

In the recent years, there is a paradigm shift in the management of necrotic immature permanent teeth, with most of these teeth being treated by revascularization rather than conventional apexification procedure. Current regenerative endodontic protocols (REP) emphasizes the need to have a disinfection protocols that will enable good disinfection without causing damage to stem cells. The current available evidence suggest that true pulp-dentin complex is not being formed after REP, nevertheless it can result in continued root development that will enable such tooth to survive for a long time. This article highlights the recent trends in revascularization procedures.

Keywords: Growth factor, Immature teeth, Revascularization, Scaffold, Stem cell.

How to cite this article: Velmurugan N. Revascularization of Necrotic Immature Permanent Teeth: An Update. J Oper Dent Endod 2016;1(1):18-24.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None


 
REVIEW ARTICLE
Arunajatesan Subbiya, Angambakkam Rajasekaran Pradeepkumar

Pain Management in Endodontics

[Year:2016] [Month:July-December] [Volumn:1 ] [Number:2] [Pages:51] [Pages No:76-81][No of Hits : 2262]


ABSTRACT

Management of dental pain during and after endodontic treatment remains a big challenge. Dental anxiety can also influence the patient’s perception of pain and is known to directly lower the pain threshold. Psychological intervention in acute dental pain may be a very effective noninvasive measure to reduce pain. However, the pulp that has been diagnosed with irreversible pulpitis, with spontaneous, moderate-to-severe pain may not respond to the local anesthetic (LA) enough for the operator to pursue a painless treatment. In this review, pain predisposing factors and pain prevention techniques are evaluated, and various strategies to overcome anesthetic failures are reviewed which will help the practitioner achieve effective pain management.

Keywords: Anesthesia, Irreversible pulpits, Pain, Root canal, Success.

How to cite this article: Subbiya A, Pradeepkumar AR. Pain Management in Endodontics. J Oper Dent Endod 2016;1(2):76-81.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None


 
Invited Review
A Parameswaran

Evolving from Principles of GV Black

[Year:2016] [Month:January-June] [Volumn:1 ] [Number:1] [Pages:45] [Pages No:3-6][No of Hits : 1974]


ABSTRACT

The Father of Modern Dentistry, Greene Vardiman Black, had played a vital role in elevating the dental profession to an autonomous status. Modern dentistry has continuously evolved from the time of GV Black. Now, there has been a paradigm shift in concept from ‘Extension for prevention’ to ‘Restriction with conviction’. ‘Medical model’ of caries management has been recognized as the most logical approach for success. The prediction of GV Black that ‘The professional person has no right to be other than a continuous student’ has become a reality. It is the duty of every conservative dentist to appreciate and adopt the changes and this will be the real tribute paid to the pioneers of the profession.

Keywords: Evolving principles, GV black, Modern dentistry.

How to cite this article: Parameswaran A. Evolving from Principles of Gv Black. J Oper Dent Endod 2016;1(1):3-6.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None


 
Invited Review
Raghu Srinivasan, Ramya Raghu

Treatment Outcomes in Endodontics

[Year:2016] [Month:January-June] [Volumn:1 ] [Number:1] [Pages:45] [Pages No:13-17][No of Hits : 1919]


ABSTRACT

The success of endodontic treatment has been of great interest to practitioners for many years now. Endodontic failures, which are of particular interest to us, are due to either microbial or nonmicrobial reasons. It is often thought that procedural errors like ledging, perforation, overfilling, underfilling or instrument separation invariably result in failure. In reality, the fact is that such mishaps only impede the accomplishment of an ideal root canal treatment. It is often the concomitant presence of infection that ultimately results in failure.
Numerous studies have evaluated the success or failure of endodontic therapy and reported a wide range of success rates from 40 to 93%.This wide range may be due to differences in clinical procedure, experimental design, criteria for evaluation and the length of the observation period. However, most authors conclude that the crucial factor influencing success is the preoperative status of the tooth. Teeth with an apical radiolucency show a 20% lower success rate than teeth without lesion.
Till date, the main method of evaluating success is radiographic, using recall radiographs. This method, however, is not without its own limitations due to examiner bias and inconsistencies.
The factors affecting treatment outcome include those related to diagnosis, preoperative condition of the patient and tooth, standard of care during treatment, postoperative factors and ongoing maintenance. This paper reviews the various factors influencing the outcome of endodontic treatment in light of modern thought.

Keywords: Failure, Postoperative factors, Preoperative factors, Standard of care, Success, Treatment outcome.

How to cite this article: Srinivasan R, Raghu R. Treatment Outcomes in Endodontics. J Oper Dent Endod 2016;1(1):13-17.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None


 
Case Report
Mahendran Kavitha, Shekar Shobana

Management of External Cervical Root Resorption in Mandibular Molar

[Year:2016] [Month:January-June] [Volumn:1 ] [Number:1] [Pages:45] [Pages No:39-45][No of Hits : 1488]


ABSTRACT

External root resorption of teeth takes its origin from periodontal tissues but is often an endodontic enigma. A combined endoperio management is required if the external resorption involves both entities. This article describes the management of an external resorption in mandibular first molar by intentional reimplantation using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) as an adjunctive diagnostic aid. Following atraumatic extraction of 36, endodontic treatment was performed extraorally, followed by sealing of the resorptive site using Biodentine. The periodontal procedures included guided tissue regeneration using a bioresorbable membrane and placement of osseograft for bone regeneration. After a follow-up period of 10 months, the patient was totally asymptomatic. Intentional reimplantation is a viable treatment option for external root resorption of inaccessible sites.

Keywords: Biodentine, External cervical root resorption, Guided tissue regeneration, Intentional reimplantation.

How to cite this article: Kavitha M, Shobana S. Management of External Cervical Root Resorption in Mandibular Molar. J Oper Dent Endod 2016;1(1):39-45.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None


 
REVIEW ARTICLE
Rajesh S Nair, Betty Babu, Eeshan Mushtaq

Cold Atmospheric Plasma in Dentistry

[Year:2016] [Month:July-December] [Volumn:1 ] [Number:2] [Pages:51] [Pages No:82-86][No of Hits : 1328]


ABSTRACT

Introduction: Plasma is the fourth state of matter and others are liquid, gas, and solid. Plasma occurs as a natural phenomenon in the universe and appears in the form of fire, in the polar aurora borealis and in the nuclear fusion reactions of the sun. It can be produced artificially which has gained importance in the fields of plasma screens or light sources. Plasma is of two types: Thermal and nonthermal or cold atmospheric plasma (CAP). Thermal plasma has electrons and heavy particles (ions and neutral) at the same temperature. Cold atmospheric plasma is said to be nonthermal as it has electron at a hotter temperature than the heavy particles that are at room temperature. Cold atmospheric plasma is a specific type of plasma, i.e., <104°F at the point of application. It could become a new and painless method to prepare cavities for restoration with improved longevity. Also it is capable of bacterial inactivation and noninflammatory tissue alteration, which makes it an attractive tool for the treatment of dental caries and for composite restorations. Plasma can also be used for tooth whitening. This review focuses on some dental application of plasma.

Keywords: Cold atmospheric plasma, Nonthermal atmospheric plasma, Plasma dentistry.

How to cite this article: Nair RS, Babu B, Mushtaq E. Cold Atmospheric Plasma in Dentistry. J Oper Dent Endod 2016;1(2):82-86.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None


 
Invited Review
Meenakshisundaram Rajasekaran, Deepavalli Arumuga Nainar, Swarna Alamelu, Arun KV

Microbiological Profile in Endodontic-periodontal Lesion

[Year:2016] [Month:January-June] [Volumn:1 ] [Number:1] [Pages:45] [Pages No:25-29][No of Hits : 1305]


ABSTRACT

Endodontic-periodontal lesion is a clinical manifestation of the pathologic intercommunication between pulpal and periodontal tissues. In general, these lesions are multifaceted in nature and can have a varied pathogenesis. Fundamental to our understanding of the pulpoperiodontal lesions is the key role of the pathogenic ecosystem that exists within this complex structure. Evidence suggests that there exists a wide range of microbial species in the periapical and periodontal tissues and that their concurrent pathogenesis is constantly linked to the bacterial interrelations between the two tissue types. Understanding the microbial involvement is of utmost significance as it offers a rationale for differential diagnosis and subsequent management of such lesions. This review has attempted to provide a basic insight on the microbiome or the microbial flora entailed in the bidirectional pathogenesis of endodontic-periodontal lesions.

Keywords: Endodontic-periodontal lesion, Microbiology, Periapical lesion, Periodontal disease, Persistent disease.

How to cite this article: Rajasekaran M, Nainar DA, Alamelu S, KV Arun. Microbiological Profile in Endodontic-periodontal Lesion. J Oper Dent Endod 2016;1(1):25-29.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None


 
ORIGINAL RESEARCH
Jonathan Emil Sam, Paulaian Benin, Ruth Hepsi Beaulah, Gnanaseelan, Lal Krishna, Jacob Raja

Comparative Evaluation of Antibacterial Efficacy of Four Toothpastes and Mouthwashes against Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus: An in vivo Study

[Year:2016] [Month:July-December] [Volumn:1 ] [Number:2] [Pages:51] [Pages No:60-65][No of Hits : 1096]


ABSTRACT

Background: Cariogenic microorganisms are the most important cause for occurrence of dental caries. Dentifrices and mouthwashes containing antimicrobial substances are proven to be effective in the eradication of these pathogens from the oral cavity.

Aim: To evaluate the antimicrobial efficacy of fluoride, chlorhexidine (CHX), herbal, and xylitol containing toothpastes and mouthwashes against Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) and Lactobacillus (LB) in subjects within the age group of 18 to 22 years at time intervals of 1, 3, and 6 months.

Materials and methods: One hundred subjects were randomly divided into four groups. Group I: fluoride, group II: chlorhexidine, group III: herbal, group IV: xylitol and instructed to use toothpastes and mouthwashes containing the specific agents. Salivary samples were collected to evaluate the levels of S. mutans and LB at baseline, 1, 3, and 6 months. Bacterial levels were evaluated using caries risk test (CRT) kit. Data were analyzed using analysis of variance and post hoc test.

Results: During intragroup comparison, S. mutans levels in group I showed statistically significant difference among the four time intervals. On intergroup comparison, S. mutans levels after 6 months for groups I, II, III, and IV were 1.12, 1.16, 1.28, and 1.4 respectively.

Conclusion: It can be concluded that fluoride, CHX, and xylitol showed a significant reduction in S. mutans and LB count after a time period of 6 months while herbal group did not show a significant reduction in S. mutans and LB count at any intervals.

Keywords: Chlorhexidine, Fluoride, Herbal, Lactobacillus, Streptococcus mutans, Xylitol.

How to cite this article: Sam JE, Benin P, Beaulah RH, Gnanaseelan, Krishna L, Raja J. Comparative Evaluation of Antibacterial Efficacy of Four Toothpastes and Mouthwashes against Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus: An in vivo Study. J Oper Dent Endod 2016;1(2):60-65.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None


 
Case Report
R Randhya, Sathish Sundar, Dinesh Kowsky, N Velmurugan, Buvaneshwari Arul

Unusual Location of a Second Mesiobuccal Canal in the Maxillary First Molar managed with the Aid of Cone-beam Computed Tomography

[Year:2016] [Month:January-June] [Volumn:1 ] [Number:1] [Pages:45] [Pages No:35-38][No of Hits : 1022]


ABSTRACT

Introduction: The purpose of this article was to emphasize the importance of understanding root canal anatomy and its variations for successful endodontic treatment.

Methods: This case report presents the detection and endodontic management of eccentrically placed second mesiobuccal (MB) canal in maxillary first molar with the help of dental operating microscope and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scanning.

Results: Cone-beam computed tomography images showed broad MB root with second MB canal located closer to palatal orifice.

Conclusion: This report describes a variation in canal location and complex anatomy of maxillary first molar with posttreatment apical periodontitis which was managed successfully with the aid of dental operating microscope and CBCT.

Keywords: Cone-beam computed tomography, Maxillary first molar, Second mesiobuccal canal.

How to cite this article: Randhya R, Sundar S, Kowsky D, Velmurugan N, Arul B. Unusual Location of a Second Mesiobuccal Canal in the Maxillary First Molar managed with the Aid of Cone-beam Computed Tomography. J Oper Dent Endod 2016;1(1):35-38.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None


 
Invited Review
Xu Zhang, Zuohui Xiao, Haorong Wang, Anil Kishen

Biomineralization and Biomaterial Considerations in Dentin Remineralization

[Year:2016] [Month:January-June] [Volumn:1 ] [Number:1] [Pages:45] [Pages No:7-12][No of Hits : 990]


ABSTRACT

Dentin is a composite hard tissue, comprising of inorganic and organic matrices, and regulated by many proteins during development. The demineralization of dentin results from the loss of inorganic matrix [mainly hydroxyapatite (HAP)], but the organic matrix (mainly type I collagen) will sustain for a period of time after demineralization. Over the past decade, there has been a growing interest on the remineralization of demineralized dentin, primarily in connection with minimally invasive caries management. More and more biomaterials and methods are currently being evaluated to achieve newer approaches for the remineralization of demineralized dentin. These strategies are mostly based on biomimetic approaches and aim to achieve the characteristics of natural hard tissue. This article will present a complete review on the basic compositions and properties of dentin, which formed the basis for the biomimetic remineralization of demineralized dentin.

Keywords: Biomineralization, Collagen, Dentin, Noncollagenous proteins, Remineralization.

How to cite this article: Zhang X, Xiao Z, Wang H, Kishen A. Biomineralization and Biomaterial Considerations in Dentin Remineralization. J Oper Dent Endod 2016;1(1):7-12.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None


 
Invited Review
Nandini S

Scientific Publishing: The ‘Write’ Tips

[Year:2016] [Month:January-June] [Volumn:1 ] [Number:1] [Pages:45] [Pages No:30-34][No of Hits : 870]


ABSTRACT

Publishing in a peer-reviewed journal is the ultimate platform to share new knowledge with other researchers, health professionals and the public. Few of the submitted articles may not even reach peer-review stage. It can get rejected either at the technical modification/initial screening stage or after the review is completed. To avoid rejections at the initial stage, the manuscript should be well-drafted according to author instructions of the selected journal. This article aims in providing the young researchers with tips to write an article for biomedical journal.

Keywords: Manuscript rejection, Scientific writing, Writing skills.

How to cite this article: Nandini S. Scientific Publishing: The ‘Write’ Tips. J Oper Dent Endod 2016;1(1):30-34.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None


 
CASE REPORT
Venkat Canakapalli

Invasive Cervical Resorption: A Clinical Case Report demonstrating the Value of CBCT in Diagnosis and Treatment Planning

[Year:2016] [Month:July-December] [Volumn:1 ] [Number:2] [Pages:51] [Pages No:87-89][No of Hits : 801]


ABSTRACT

Invasive cervical resorption (ICR) is a common clinical entity. Invasive cervical resorption can be arrested using the “Heithersay approach” (i.e., mechanical debridement, treatment with TCA, and restoration). Prudent case selection and proper execution can lead to the successful treatment and long-term retention of the tooth. The key aspects are the location, size, and accessibility of the lesion and the structural integrity of the tooth. Cone beam computed tomography imaging is an invaluable tool to assess and treat ICR.

Keywords: Cervical resorption, Cone beam computed tomography, Heithersay Approach, Invasice cervial resorption.

How to cite this article: Canakapalli V. Invasive Cervical Resorption: A Clinical Case Report demonstrating the Value of CBCT in Diagnosis and Treatment Planning. J Oper Dent Endod 2016;1(2):87-89.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None


 
ORIGINAL RESEARCH
Madhusudhana Koppolu, Ram Basam, Chinni Suneelkumar, Anumula Lavanya

Apical Debris Extrusion during Root Canal Preparation with ProTaper Next and Mani Silk Rotary Systems: An in vitro Study

[Year:2016] [Month:July-December] [Volumn:1 ] [Number:2] [Pages:51] [Pages No:66-69][No of Hits : 788]


ABSTRACT

Aim: To evaluate the amount of apically extruded debris after the preparation of root canals in extracted human single-rooted teeth using ProTaper Next and Mani Silk rotary systems.

Materials and methods: A total of 40 freshly extracted human single-rooted teeth with mature apices and straight root canal were selected and similar length were instrumented with Pro- Taper Next and Mani Silk rotary systems. Debris and irrigant extruded during instrumentation were collected into preweighed Eppendorf tubes. The Eppendorf tubes were then stored in an incubator at 68°C for 5 days. The weight of the extruded debris was determined by subtracting the initial weight from the final weight.

Statistical analysis: Data analysis was carried out using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version 20. Postweights were compared with an independent t test for 2 groups.

Results: Both instruments were associated with apical debris extrusion. There was no significant difference between the ProTaper Next and Mani Silk instruments in terms of mean weight of apically extruded debris.

Conclusion: There was no significant difference among the groups in terms of mean weight of apically extruded debris.

Keywords: Apical debris extrusion, Eppendorf tube, Manisilk, Protaper Next.

How to cite this article: Koppolu M, Basam R, Suneelkumar C, Lavanya A. Apical Debris Extrusion during Root Canal Preparation with ProTaper Next and Mani Silk Rotary Systems: An in vitro Study. J Oper Dent Endod 2016;1(2):66-69.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None


 
ORIGINAL RESEARCH
Madhusudhana Koppolu, Yelloji Paramesh, Chinni Suneelkumar, Anumula Lavanya

Current Trends in Irrigation Practice during Endodontic Treatment among Dental Practitioners in Nellore Urban Area: A Survey

[Year:2016] [Month:July-December] [Volumn:1 ] [Number:2] [Pages:51] [Pages No:47-55][No of Hits : 720]


ABSTRACT

Aim: The purpose of this study was to determine the current trends in irrigation practice among the practicing dentists in Nellore urban area of Andhra Pradesh, India.

Materials and methods: A self-prepared questionnaire comprising 20 questions was given to 150 dentists practicing in Nellore urban area. The information gathered was the individual irrigant selection, irrigant concentration, smear layer removal, and use of adjuncts to irrigation, gauge of needle, tip design of needle, depth of needle penetration, volume of the syringe used, volume of irrigant used, duration of irrigation, choice of irrigant in vital teeth, teeth with radiographic evidence of periapical lesion, and retreatment cases.

Results: Our data indicated that majority of respondents (55.6%) are using saline as primary irrigant at a concentration of 0.9% whereas 44.4% of respondents primarily use sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), with 51.4% of them using it at a concentration of 2.6 to 4%. Twenty-six gauge needle with single-beveled tip design being most preferred for syringe irrigation. Only 59.7% of respondents aimed to remove the smear layer during endodontic treatment with only 11.9% using an adjunct to irrigation.

Conclusion: Regardless of the critical nature of the irrigation step in the endodontic therapy, the results from the study were not satisfying, especially when it comes to the use of primary irrigant, adjuncts, or newer irrigating systems. Thus there is a need to regularly update and check the practices adopted by dental practitioners.

Keywords: Irrigation protocol, Needle gauge, Saline, Sodium hypochlorite, Survey.

How to cite this article: Koppolu M, Paramesh Y, Suneelkumar C, Lavanya A. Current Trends in Irrigation Practice during Endodontic Treatment among Dental Practitioners in Nellore Urban Area: A Survey. J Oper Dent Endod 2016;1(2):47-55.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None


 
ORIGINAL RESEARCH
Poornima Reddy, Suma Balla, Sandhya S Raghu, Natanasabapathy Velmurugan, Garlapati T Gupta, Hrudi S Sahoo

Effect of 5% Calcium Hypochlorite on Mechanical Properties of Root Dentin: An in vitro Study

[Year:2016] [Month:July-December] [Volumn:1 ] [Number:2] [Pages:51] [Pages No:56-59][No of Hits : 671]


ABSTRACT

Introduction: The aim of this study was to compare in vitro the effect of 5% calcium hypochlorite [Ca(OCl)2] and 5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) on flexural strength and modulus of elasticity of root dentin.

Materials and methods: The available chlorine concentration of each solution was determined using iodometric titration. Standardized planoparallel dentin bars (n = 20) were divided into two test groups and one control group. The control, group 1, consisted of dentin bars stored in normal saline. The dentin bars in the two test groups were treated by exposure to following solutions: Group 2 to 5% Ca(OCl)2; and group 3 to 5% NaOCl. All the three test solutions were changed once in 15 minutes for 30 minutes. The dentin bars were then loaded to failure using three-point bend test.

Results: Available chlorine concentration was 64% in both the test solutions. There was a significant reduction in the flexural strength of 5% NaOCl group compared to 5% Ca(OCl)2-treated ones. A significant difference in modulus of elasticity was observed between the test groups and the control groups and also between the 5% Ca(OCl)2 and 5% NaOCl groups.

Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, 5% NaOCl reduced the flexural strength and modulus of elasticity of root dentin bars more when compared to 5% Ca(OCl)2.

Keywords: Calcium hypochlorite, Elastic modulus, Endodontic irrigant, Flexural strength, Root dentin, Sodium hypochlorite.

How to cite this article: Reddy P, Balla S, Raghu SS, Velmurugan N, Gupta GT, Sahoo HS. Effect of 5% Calcium Hypochlorite on Mechanical Properties of Root Dentin: An in vitro Study. J Oper Dent Endod 2016;1(2):56-59.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None


 
CASE REPORT
Swati Ishwar Wadekar, Dipali Yogesh Shah, Jimish Rajiv Shah, Kinjal Mahesh Gathani

Endodontic Management of a Three-rooted Mandibular First Premolar associated with Taurodontism

[Year:2016] [Month:July-December] [Volumn:1 ] [Number:2] [Pages:51] [Pages No:90-92][No of Hits : 535]


ABSTRACT

Introduction: Taurodontism is a morpho-anatomic variation in tooth anatomy that rarely affects mandibular premolars. Literature is replete with mandibular first premolars presenting atypical additional root canals, but concurrent presence of three roots and taurodontism is exceptional.

Materials and methods: This case report describes the successful endodontic diagnosis and management of a rare case of taurodontism in a mandibular first premolar with chronic apical periodontitis. Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) facilitated the diagnosis of three roots and root canals associated with concurrent taurodontism. The taurodont premolar required exceptional and diligent care in each segment of endodontic treatment for the complex root canal system.

Results: Taurodontism-affected premolars present with challenges in endodontic therapy as they have apically displaced pulp chambers with limited width. Cone beam computed tomography and dental operating microscope can facilitate evaluation for teeth with such complex anatomy and their successful endodontic management.

Keywords: Anatomic variations, Cone beam computed tomography, Endodontic therapy, Mandibular first premolar, Taurodontism.

How to cite this article: Wadekar SI, Shah DY, Shah JR, Gathani KM. Endodontic Management of a Three-rooted Mandibular First Premolar associated with Taurodontism. J Oper Dent Endod 2016;1(2):90-92.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None


 
REVIEW ARTICLE
Deepavalli Arumuga Nainar, Swarna Alamelu, KV Arun, Meenakshisundaram Rajasekaran

Immunological Profile of Periapical and Periodontal Lesions: Current Concepts in the Role of T Cells

[Year:2016] [Month:July-December] [Volumn:1 ] [Number:2] [Pages:51] [Pages No:70-75][No of Hits : 521]


ABSTRACT

Periapical lesions of endodontic origin and periodontitis are the two common chronic conditions that constitute the immunoinflammatory responses to putative oral pathogens. Both the conditions encompass similar patterns of development and pathologic mechanisms of host-mediated tissue destruction and subsequent establishment of the lesion. This host inflammatory response is attributed to a large array of immune cells that play a regulatory role in the protective and destructive pathways culminating in these two diseases. Hence, knowledge of the host response involved in their pathogenesis is essential to comprehend the disease process and thus aid in establishing proper therapeutic strategies to keep the host response under control. This review will focus on the pivotal role played by the T cells and its various subsets, namely the T helper (Th)1, Th2, Th17, Treg, Th22, and Th9, and elicit deeper insights on the Th1/Th2 and the Th17/Treg paradigm.

Keywords: Periapical lesion, Periodontal lesion, Th subsets, Th1/Th2, Th17/Treg, Th9, Th22.

How to cite this article: Nainar DA, Alamelu S, Arun KV, Rajasekaran M. Immunological Profile of Periapical and Periodontal Lesions: Current Concepts in the Role of T Cells. J Oper Dent Endod 2016;1(2):70-75.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None


 
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Arvind Kumar, Sheerin Sarthaj

In vitro Evaluation of Fracture Resistance of Endodontically treated Teeth restored with Bulk-fill, Bulk-fill Flowable, Fiber-reinforced, and Conventional Resin Composite

[Year:2018] [Month:January-June] [Volumn:3 ] [Number:1] [Pages:51] [Pages No:12-17][No of Hits : 426]


ABSTRACT

Aim: This original research was carried out to assess the susceptibility to fracture of root canal treated teeth with composite postendodontic restorations.

Materials and methods: Seventy-two sound human mandibular premolar teeth, extracted for various reasons, were selected. For experimental purposes, they were then divided into six groups (n = 12). Groups I and II were designated the negative control (no preparation done) and positive control (cavity preparation was done but left unrestored) respectively. In all other teeth, mesio-occluso-distal (MOD) cavities were prepared, and they were then root canal treated. The other groups were also restored with the respective resins: group III: condensable bulk-fill composite, group IV: bulk-fill flowable resin composite, group V: fiber-reinforced composite, and group VI: conventional resin-based composite. Manufacturerrecommended adhesive systems for respective restorative resins were used.
To avoid desiccation of the specimens, they were kept in distilled water for 24 hours at body temperature. The specimens were then subjected to compressive loads until they fractured. Statistical analysis was performed using analysis of variance (ANOVA) and post hoc Tukey tests.

Results: Statistically significant results were observed among all groups. The highest and lowest values were noted with groups I and II respectively (p = 0.05).

Conclusion: The resistance to fracture in root canal-treated teeth with everX Posterior, fiber-reinforced bulk-fill composite was the highest.

Keywords: Bulk-fill composites, Endodontically treated, Fracture resistance, Resin-based composites.

How to cite this article: Kumar A, Sarthaj S. In vitro Evaluation of Fracture Resistance of Endodontically treated Teeth restored with Bulk-fill, Bulk-fill Flowable, Fiber-reinforced, and Conventional Resin Composite. J Oper Dent Endod 2018;3(1):12-17.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None


 
INVITED ARTICLE
Carounanidy Usha

Caries Risk Assessment: A Critical Look

[Year:2018] [Month:January-June] [Volumn:3 ] [Number:1] [Pages:51] [Pages No:22-27][No of Hits : 405]


ABSTRACT

Caries risk assessment (CRA) is a concept that is firmly grounded on the well-known fact that dental caries is a disease. Steady accumulation of evidence under cariology has placed this concept as the pivotal point in management of caries disease. Although existent for decades, the CRA concept has not yet become the mainstream practice or training in India. Whatever is being practiced or taught does not seem to be proportionate enough to match its paramount importance in patient service. The reasons may be that it is still being overshadowed by the robust technical and technological growth of restorative dentistry that focuses only on restoring a carious lesion; or it does not possess enough evidence to be emphatic; or it does not provide the expected outcome reliably. The following review attempts to dissect various aspects of CRA in the realm of current evidence and propose certain future directions toward its effective adoption.

Keywords: Caries risk assessment, Cariogram, Cariology.

How to cite this article: Usha C. Caries Risk Assessment: A Critical Look. J Oper Dent Endod 2018;3(1):22-27.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None


 
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Disha Mehta, Pallav Choksi, Rupal Vaidya, Kunjal Mistry, Zarna Sanghvi, Pruthvi Patel

Comparative Evaluation of Antibacterial Efficacy of 5% Sodium Hypochlorite, 940 nm Diode Laser, and Gaseous Ozone against Enterococcus faecalis Biofilm formed on Tooth Substrate: A Scanning Electron Microscope Study

[Year:2018] [Month:January-June] [Volumn:3 ] [Number:1] [Pages:51] [Pages No:1-6][No of Hits : 368]


ABSTRACT

Aim: To comparatively assess the antibacterial effectiveness of 5% sodium hypochlorite, 940 nm diode laser, and gaseous ozone against Enterococcus faecalis biofilm produced on the substrate.

Materials and methods: Freshly extracted maxillary central incisor teeth of human source were decoronated and vertically sectioned after biomechanical preparation.
The samples were then, after sterilization, placed in Eppendorf tubes filled with 1 mL of bacterial solution containing 1.5 × 105 colony-forming units (CFUs)/mL of E. faecalis. Then, these adulterated samples were divided into four groups (n = 8) depending upon the method of disinfection used: group I, 5% sodium hypochlorite (positive control); group II, normal saline (negative control); group III, gaseous ozone; and group IV, 940 nm diode laser.
At the conclusion of 3 weeks, all the samples were disinfected according to their groups and were analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively.

Results: The positive control group (5% sodium hypochlorite) showed statistically significant results in comparison with the other three groups (p < 0.05). Statistically, there was no significant difference found between the experimental groups, i.e., ozone group and diode laser group (p > 0.05).

Conclusion: A 5% sodium hypochlorite showed the highest antibacterial effect against E. faecalis biofilm formed on substrate, i.e., tooth. Both diode laser and gaseous ozone groups have a statistically significant antibacterial action on the infected root canals.

Keywords: Biofilm, Diode laser, Enterococcus faecalis, Ozone, Root canal disinfection.

How to cite this article: Mehta D, Choksi P, Vaidya R, Mistry K, Sanghvi Z, Patel P. Comparative Evaluation of Antibacterial Efficacy of 5% Sodium Hypochlorite, 940 nm Diode Laser, and Gaseous Ozone against Enterococcus faecalis Biofilm formed on Tooth Substrate: A Scanning Electron Microscope Study. J Oper Dent Endod 2018;3(1):1-6.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None


 
CASE REPORT
Nagarajan Geethapriya, Arunajatesan Subbiya, Suresh Mitthra, Paramasivam Vivekanandhan

Management of Cracked Teeth: A Report of Two Cases

[Year:2018] [Month:January-June] [Volumn:3 ] [Number:1] [Pages:51] [Pages No:48-51][No of Hits : 339]


ABSTRACT

Cracked tooth is an incomplete crack running in the crown of the tooth starting from the cervical portion. The crack may be initiated by excessive masticatory force or unintentional bruxism. Initially, they do not present with any symptoms, but later, these cracked teeth develop pain and sensitivity, which requires treatment. Here, we have presented two case reports diagnosed as cracked teeth, which were managed successfully by root canal treatment. The cases were followed up and the patients are asymptomatic. This proves that root canal treatment is a viable choice of treatment for cracked teeth.

Keywords: Cracked tooth, Hypersensitivity, Masticatory force, Root canal treatment.

How to cite this article: Geethapriya N, Subbiya A, Mitthra S, Vivekanandhan P. Management of Cracked Teeth: A Report of Two Cases. J Oper Dent Endod 2018;3(1):48-51.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None


 
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Vibha Hegde, Amrita V Sali

Effect of Post Space Irrigation using Novel Irrigant: SmearOFF (containing Chlorhexidine and EDTA) on the Push-out Bond Strength of Fiber Posts luted with Self-adhesive Resin Cement

[Year:2018] [Month:January-June] [Volumn:3 ] [Number:1] [Pages:51] [Pages No:7-11][No of Hits : 327]


ABSTRACT

Aim: To make a comparative evaluation of the effect of different post space irrigation procedures on the push-out bond strength of prefabricated fiber posts luted with self-adhesive resin cement in different root thirds (coronal, middle, and apical).

Materials and methods: Sixty freshly extracted single-rooted teeth were selected, and after root canal preparation and obturation, standardized post spaces were prepared. Teeth were then randomly divided into four groups (n = 15), according to the different post space irrigants used: group I—distilled water (control); group II—17% ethylenediaminetetracetic acid (EDTA) + 2.5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl); group III—99% ethanol; group IV—SmearOFF. All solutions were maintained in the root canals for 60 seconds and dried with paper points. Prefabricated fiber posts were luted using the self-adhesive resin cement. The push-out test was carried out by applying a load using Instron Universal Testing Machine.

Results: The results of the analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the post hoc Bonferroni tests revealed that the push-out bond strength was significantly affected by the different post space irrigants (p < 0.001). However, no significant difference in push-out bond strength was attained with reference to the different locations inside the canal (i.e., coronal, middle, and apical) (p > 0.05).

Conclusion: Pretreatment of the post space using 99% ethanol resulted in highest bond strength with respect to prefabricated fiber posts luted with self-adhesive resin cement. The push-out bond strengths exhibited by both, the newly launched irrigant: SmearOFF and the combination of EDTA + NaOCl, were comparable.

Clinical significance: Irrigation of post space after mechanical post space preparation is the central key to remove smear layer, open dentinal tubules along with achieving superior bond strength of fiber posts cemented with a self-adhesive resin cement to root dentin.

Keywords: Ethanol, Fiber post, Irrigation, Push-out, SmearOFF.

How to cite this article: Hegde V, Sali AV. Effect of Post Space Irrigation using Novel Irrigant: SmearOFF (containing Chlorhexidine and EDTA) on the Push-out Bond Strength of Fiber Posts luted with Self-adhesive Resin Cement. J Oper Dent Endod 2018;3(1):7-11.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None


 
CASE REPORT
S Vidhya Shankari, R Vinoo Subramaniam, K Karpagavinayagam, R Vaishnavi

Smile Design using Recurring Esthetic Dental Proportion

[Year:2018] [Month:January-June] [Volumn:3 ] [Number:1] [Pages:51] [Pages No:33-37][No of Hits : 315]


ABSTRACT

Beautiful confident smile has a positive impact on the psychosocial well-being of patients. Spacing present in the anterior region makes a patient feel dissatisfied with their smile. Over the years, a number of innovative techniques have been described in the treatment of diastema. However, a less invasive and short-time treatment procedure with satisfactory result is preferred by the patient. This case report describes the technique of anterior diastema closure by applying Recurring Esthetic Dental (RED) proportion for smile designing using direct composite resin. The RED proportion has been stated to be an essential tool for achieving esthetics and harmony in smile.

Keywords: Composite restoration, Diastema, Esthetics, Facial image view analysis values, Recurring esthetic dental proportion.

How to cite this article: Shankari SV, Subramaniam RV, Karpagavinayagam K, Vaishnavi R. Smile Design using Recurring Esthetic Dental Proportion. J Oper Dent Endod 2018;3(1):33-37.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None


 
CASE REPORT
Mahendran Kavitha, K Girija, Shekar Shobana

Management of Internal Resorption with Perforation

[Year:2018] [Month:January-June] [Volumn:3 ] [Number:1] [Pages:51] [Pages No:38-42][No of Hits : 288]


ABSTRACT

Internal root resorption is a pathologic intraradicular process in which there is loss of dental hard tissue due to osteoclastic activity inside the root canal space. It is a rare lesion of permanent teeth, which might be caused due to caries, trauma, restorative procedures, etc. Because of its insidious pathology, it can extend to significant dimensions before being diagnosed and may lead to perforation to external root surface due to progressive odontoclastic activity. This article describes two case reports of surgical management of a perforating internal resorption in maxillary central incisors, managed by routine root canal treatment, followed by repair with Biodentine and mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). About 12 to 24 months of follow-up demonstrated clinically asymptomatic and adequately functional tooth, with radiographic signs of healing. Care was taken to conserve the tooth structure and avoid further weakening of the alreadycompromised tooth. A tooth deemed to have a questionable prognosis was conserved and found to demonstrate satisfactory healing with no radiographic evidence of progressive resorption.

Keywords: Biodentine, Internal resorption, Mineral trioxide aggregate, Osteoclastic activity, Perforation, Thermoplasticized obturation.

How to cite this article: Kavitha M, Girija K, Shobana S. Management of Internal Resorption with Perforation. J Oper Dent Endod 2018;3(1):38-42.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None


 
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Sneha Jeetendra, Anithakumari Rangappa, Meena Naganathan, Vijayalakshmi Lakshminarasimhaiah

Influence of Dentin Desensitizers on the Bond Strength of Self-etch Adhesive to Dentin: An in vitro Study

[Year:2018] [Month:January-June] [Volumn:3 ] [Number:1] [Pages:51] [Pages No:18-21][No of Hits : 285]


ABSTRACT

Aims and objectives: Hypersensitivity is a multietiological clinical problem. Many desensitizing treatments have been advocated to reduce the hypersensitivity. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of few in-office desensitizing agents on the bond strength of composite restoration.

Materials and methods: Forty-eight sound human premolars were used for the study. The occlusal surface of each teeth was grounded with a diamond disk to expose the flat dentin surface, polished with 120 and 320 silicon grit sand paper.
The specimens were then divided into four groups (n = 12) based on the type of dentin desensitizing agent given. Group I was treated with Vivasens, group II was treated with MS Coat F, group III was treated with Solo Eze, and group IV served as a control where no desensitizing agent was used. The specimens were treated with one-step self-etch and restored with composites according to the manufacturer’s instructions. The specimens were then stored in distilled water for 24 hours and subjected to Universal Testing Machine to check the tensile bond strength.

Results: Statistical analysis of the data obtained revealed the mean values for the tensile bond strengths were 92.53, 71.07, 95.07, 160.28 N for groups I to IV respectively. These values were statistically significantly different between groups pretreated with desensitizing agents as compared with control group.

Conclusion: Dentin pretreated with desensitizing agents has lower tensile bond strength with resin composites as compared with dentin that is untreated. Among the experimental groups, hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA)-containing desensitizing agents had better bond strength compared with the fluoridecontaining agents.

Keywords: Desensitizing agents, Self-etch adhesive, Tensile bond strength.

How to cite this article: Jeetendra S, Rangappa A, Naganathan M, Lakshminarasimhaiah V. Influence of Dentin Desensitizers on the Bond Strength of Self-etch Adhesive to Dentin: An in vitro Study. J Oper Dent Endod 2018;3(1):18-21.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None


 
CASE REPORT
Allu Baby, Liza George, T Prasanth Dhanapal, KM Charlie, Shabeer Ummer TK, Helma George

Endodontic Management of Mandibular Premolars with Three Roots and Three Canals

[Year:2018] [Month:January-June] [Volumn:3 ] [Number:1] [Pages:51] [Pages No:28-32][No of Hits : 247]


ABSTRACT

Proper knowledge of the internal anatomy of tooth is essential for the long-term success of endodontic treatment. Mandibular premolars exhibit a greater variation in their internal morphology due to the occurrence of additional roots and root canals. This article showcases two case reports of successful endodontic management of mandibular premolars with three roots and three canals. A detailed diagnosis of symptomatic irreversible pulpitis with apical periodontitis was made through clinical and radiographic examinations. Endodontic management was carried out successfully and the patient was evaluated.

Keywords: Anatomical variations of teeth, Endodontic management, Mandibular premolar, Root canal anatomy.

How to cite this article: Baby A, George L, Dhanapal TP, Charlie KM, Shabeer Ummer TK, George H. Endodontic Management of Mandibular Premolars with Three Roots and Three Canals. J Oper Dent Endod 2018;3(1):28-32.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None


 
CASE REPORT
Nikita Sarraf, Jaya Purewal, Deepak Raisingani, Ashwini Prasad

Management of the Open Apex using New Biomaterials

[Year:2018] [Month:January-June] [Volumn:3 ] [Number:1] [Pages:51] [Pages No:43-47][No of Hits : 222]


ABSTRACT

At the time of root development, trauma or caries results in tooth with immature and open root apices. The single most important factor that affects the success of endodontics is achievement of perfect apical seal. Apexification is done to achieve an apical barrier against which the obturating material can be condensed. Nowadays due to new advancements in materials and methods, single-visit apexification as compared with long and multiple visits (calcium hydroxide apexification) has gained popularity. With the new bioceramic materials like mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and Biodentine, perfect seal can be achieved much more easily and effectively. Various treatment modalities are present to treat immature open root apices. Retrograde root end filling by surgical intervention provides faster healing of the associated lesions. Both MTA and Biodentine promise to be quite reliable retrograde filling materials. In the following case reports, apexification using different treatment modalities— newer biomaterials—is explained.

Keywords: Apexification, Biodentine, Biomaterials, Blunderbuss canal, Immature root apices, Mineral trioxide aggregate, Retrograde filling.

How to cite this article: Sarraf N, Purewal J, Raisingani D, Prasad A. Management of the Open Apex using New Biomaterials. J Oper Dent Endod 2018;3(1):43-47.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None


 
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Sabari Murugesan, Rajasekaran M, Veni Ashok Baskaran, Shankar Narayan Gopal, Indra R, Ramachandran S

Scanning Electron Microscope Evaluation of Smear Layer Removal at the Coronal, Middle, and Apical Third of Root Canals using Er,Cr:YSGG Laser: An in vitro Study

[Year:2017] [Month:January-June] [Volumn:2 ] [Number:1] [Pages:53] [Pages No:11-14][No of Hits : 388]


ABSTRACT

The aim of the study was to analyse the smear layer removal at the coronal,middle and apical third of the root canals by using Er, Cr; YSGG laser system equipped with conical tip of 300 μm. A total of 80 single rooted extracted human mandibular premolars were endodontically prepared with rotary instrumentation and irrigated with 5.25% sodium hypochlorite and were randomly divided in to four groups (20 tooth each). GROUP I: Served as control (non lased group), in which root canal were irrigated with 17% EDTA .GROUP II : 17% EDTA irrigant activated by laser with conical fibre tip at the coronal region .GROUP III: 17% EDTA irrigant activated by laser with conical fibre tip at the middle region.GROUP IV: 17% EDTA irrigant activated by laser with conical fibre tip at the apex region.The results showed complete smear layer removal at the coronal and middle region when compared to apical third of the root canal system.

Keywords: Er, Cr: YSGG Laser, Root canals, Scanning electron microscope, Smear layer.

How to cite this article: Murugesan S, Rajasekaran M, Baskaran VA, Gopal SN, Indra R, Ramachandran S. Scanning Electron Microscope Evaluation of Smear Layer Removal at the Coronal, Middle, and Apical Third of Root Canals using Er,Cr:YSGG Laser: An in vitro Study. J Oper Dent Endod 2017;2(1):11-14.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None


 
SCIENTIFIC MEET
Rajasekaran M, Veni Ashok B

Rotary Endodontics-CDE program

[Year:2017] [Month:July-December] [Volumn:2 ] [Number:2] [Pages:49] [Pages No:104][No of Hits : 270]


ABSTRACT

Conservative Dentistry and Endodontics Association (CEAT) in association with Coltene Whaledent, India conducted a one day lecture and hands on course for the association members on 4th Dec 2016. The guest speaker Dr Jayshree Hegde, renowned endodontist from Bengaluru, gave an indepth analysis of the Hyflex files, its types and various applications compared with other rotary files currently available in the market.


 
SCIENTIFIC MEET
M Kavitha

ConclavE 2016

[Year:2017] [Month:January-June] [Volumn:2 ] [Number:1] [Pages:53] [Pages No:50][No of Hits : 247]


ABSTRACT

The Department of Conservative Dentistry and Endodontics, Tamil Nadu Government Dental College and Hospital, Chennai, India, organized a community development education program titled ConclavE 2016 on full mouth rehabilitation in association with the Conservative and Endodontic Association of Tamil Nadu and the Indian Association of Conservative Dentistry and Endodontics (IACDE) on December 15, 2016.


 
SCIENTIFIC MEET
Meenakshisundaram Rajasekaran, Baskaran Veni Ashok

Postgraduate Colloquium (2016)

[Year:2017] [Month:January-June] [Volumn:2 ] [Number:1] [Pages:53] [Pages No:53][No of Hits : 243]


ABSTRACT

The second edition of postgraduate (PG) Colloquium was held at Ragas Dental College and Hospital, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India on September 23 and 24, 2016, on behalf of the Conservative Dentistry and Endodontics Association of Tamil Nadu, India. Drs Revathi Miglani, Sunnel Kumar Chinni, and Chitrarasan MD (Radiologist) gave guest lectures. Around 250 PG students and delegates across PG colleges of Tamil Nadu attended the 2-day event.


 
SCIENTIFIC MEET
S Thillainayagam

RACE—2017 Report

[Year:2017] [Month:July-December] [Volumn:2 ] [Number:2] [Pages:49] [Pages No:103][No of Hits : 242]


ABSTRACT

RACE—17 (Rapid Analysis of Conservative Dentistry and Endodontics) is a Ist National level program organised by Department of Conservative Dentistry and Endodontics, Adhiparasakthi Dental College & Hospital in association with IACDE and Conservative Dentistry and Endodontics Association of Tamil Nadu (CEAT) for final year students. Inauguration of the program was done by Dr Mohan, Secretary of IACDE, Dr Rajasekaran, Secretary of CEAT, Dr Karunakaran, Former Secretary of IACDE with Dr S Thillainayagam, Principal, Dr Ramesh, Managing Director Adhiparasakthi Denatl College & Hospital.


 
SCIENTIFIC MEET
Arunajatesan Subbiya

ECCLIRES

[Year:2017] [Month:January-June] [Volumn:2 ] [Number:1] [Pages:53] [Pages No:51-52][No of Hits : 204]


ABSTRACT

The Endodontics and Conservative Dentistry Clinical Research (ECCLIRES) convention is conducted as an annual event to emphasize the importance of clinical research and serves as a nationally recognized forum for presentation of new clinical research findings. The objective of team ECCLIRES is to encourage and inculcate interest in young minds to do clinical research.


 
From the Editor’s Desk
Mahendran Kavitha

From the Editor’s Desk

[Year:2016] [Month:January-June] [Volumn:1 ] [Number:1] [Pages:45] [Pages No:1][No of Hits : 442]


ABSTRACT

It gives me immense pleasure in sharing my thoughts in this first issue of An Official Publication of Conservative Dentistry and Endodontics Association of Tamil Nadu (CEAT)-Journal of Operative Dentistry and Endodontics (JODE).

How to cite this article: Kavitha M. From the Editor’s Desk. J Oper Dent Endod 2016;1(1):1.


 
SCIENTIFIC MEET
Natanasabapathy Velmurugan

Recapitulation

[Year:2016] [Month:July-December] [Volumn:1 ] [Number:2] [Pages:51] [Pages No:93][No of Hits : 344]


ABSTRACT

The Annual Continuing Dental Education (CDE) program Recapitulation - VIII was conducted as an International symposium on July 8, 2016, at Meenakshi Ammal Dental College by Department of Conservative Dentistry and Endodontics. We were honored to have Dr Anil Kishen, Professor, Head, Discipline of Endodontics, University of Toronto, Canada, who delivered a guest lecture on “Root Dentin Stabilization.” The program was attended by over 250 delegates from colleges across India. This program provided an opportunity for delegates and postgraduate students to have an insight into an unexplored topic “Root Dentin Stabilization.”


 
From the Head Office
Srinivasan MR, Meenakshisundaram Rajasekaran

From the Head Office

[Year:2016] [Month:January-June] [Volumn:1 ] [Number:1] [Pages:45] [Pages No:2][No of Hits : 293]


ABSTRACT

With great pride and privilege, we take this opportunity to thank the editorial team of Journal of Operative Dentistry and Endodontics (JODE) for their relentless efforts and implacable dedication to bring out its first issue of An Official Publication of Conservative Dentistry and Endodontics Association of Tamil Nadu (CEAT).

How to cite this article: Srinivasan MR, Rajasekaran M. From the Head Office. J Oper Dent Endod 2016;1(1):2.


 
SCIENTIFIC MEET
Manali Ramakrishnan Srinivasan

Smile Makeover

[Year:2016] [Month:July-December] [Volumn:1 ] [Number:2] [Pages:51] [Pages No:97][No of Hits : 279]


ABSTRACT

Smile is a curve that sets everything straight.
Esthetic dentistry today plays a major role in the practice of dentistry with ever-changing concepts on adhesion and the restorative materials used for smile designing and makeover. Hence, it is imperative for the clinicians to update themselves on the recent concepts of composite resins-the most commonly used esthetic restorative material.


 
SCIENTIFIC MEET
Thillainayagam

Rapid Analysis of Conservative Dentistry and Endodontics (RACE–2016)

[Year:2016] [Month:July-December] [Volumn:1 ] [Number:2] [Pages:51] [Pages No:94][No of Hits : 216]


ABSTRACT

Rapid Analysis of Conservative Dentistry and Endodontics is a state level exam oriented refresher program for final year undergraduates. It was started in 2015 and now the program is jointly organized in association with CEAT and conducted between June 10 and 11,2016. The topics for this program were selected from the previous year university papers. These topics will be covered by the leading academicians from various colleges across the state.


 
SCIENTIFIC MEET
Sekar Mahalaxmi

SPIRIT National Convention

[Year:2016] [Month:July-December] [Volumn:1 ] [Number:2] [Pages:51] [Pages No:95-96][No of Hits : 193]


ABSTRACT

Department of Conservative Dentistry & Endodontics, SRM Dental College, Ramapuram, Chennai, organized the 3rd SPIRIT National Convention on 15 and 16 July 2016, under the banner of IACDE & IES. SPIRIT acronym stands for science based on principles, inventions, research, and innovative thoughts. This program aims to bring out the hidden and latent talents, giving postgraduates an opportunity to present their investigative and analytical skills and also to interact with their fellow researchers. This unique national-level event comprises table-top model display, debate, lectures by eminent national speakers, webinars by international speakers, and quiz competition.



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